StarShipSofa: Slush Submission Update and Episode 400 Special

So I’ve been slowly, slowly hacking my way through the slush pile of StarShipSofa. It’s a process that simultaneously fun and wondrous, but daunting and difficult. I love being able to see what other people have written and nothing can compare to finding that diamond in the rough and knowing you have to take it, shooting off an acceptance and getting an excited email back filled with thank yous and how they can’t wait to see the finished product.

But.

But it’s also very hard to let go off some of these stories. Very, very hard. But unfortunately that’s part of the process and it has to be done. And there’s always another story for you to send.

Okay, enough of the petty sentiments: At this point, I have read and responded to everything up until July 3. If you haven’t heard back, you are currently in the 2nd round. I will not be tackling this until I finish the rest of the slush, as there was a barrage of last-minute submissions. I’ll let you know as soon as I can.

The other major thing? That would be the very special episode 400 of StarShipSofa. We’ve got a groundbreaking author lined up, one responsible for making SF/F what it is today. This author is without question of the most popular and well known writers in and outside genre. A pillar of contemporary literature. StarShipSofa has been graced with the mammoths that are George R. R. Martin, Neil Gaiman, Gene Wolfe, Michael Moorcock, Lisa Tuttle, Kim Stanley Robinson, and now this author.

Who is it?

You’re going to have to find out yourself. It’s taken months of planning, but it’s nearly here. And I can’t wait to see what you think.

StarShipSofa: Submissions and Slush Update

Hey guys,

Just an update for you in regards to StarShipSofa’s submissions. I’m so sorry that it’s taking so long – I got far many more submissions than I could possibly have expected, many of which were in the 8k+ and upwards length. Additionally, I became very ill at one point and couldn’t muster the strength to sit up in bed, let alone read slush. And now that I’m back at university, things are more hectic than ever. I’m starting to read submissions during my lunch breaks between classes, it’s the only way I can keep up.

But enough excuses. At this point, I’ve read and responded to everything up to June 23. If you haven’t heard back from me at this point, I’ve put your story in the 2nd round and I’ll be holding onto it before making a final decision. And good lord, you guys have made those decisions hard as hell. Seriously, there have been some pieces I’ve found so hard to let go, but ultimately had to. This is both a good and bad thing, as it means I can take the crème de la crème, but also makes it very difficult to send that rejection. But if I took everything that I wanted to, StarShipSofa would be backlogged for years. Several years. Yes, I got that many submissions. You guys are awesome.

Also, just so you know I always personalize my rejections, and I try to give some feedback as to why I had to say no. And if I asked you to submit next time we’re open, I definitely mean it.

I’ll keep reading as fast as I can. If I haven’t gotten back to you that means you’re still under serious consideration. Please be patient, and thanks again for sending me your work.

– Jeremy

My interview with the Lord Grimdark/Joe Abercrombie

A little late with posting this, but life’s been hectic. Very hectic,

Anyway, our latest episode over at StarShipSofa is very special. Why? Not only do we have a fantastic short story by Peter F. Hamilton, but we also have an interview with Mr. Joe Abercrombie, the Lord Grimdark himself.

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We chatted about his books, his jagged prose style, the way he approaches fantasy as a whole, why he choose to write homages to other genres, why the Shattered Seas trilogy was so different to the First Law, and mostly importantly, why a long-time fantasy writer decided to set his latest books in a post-apocalyptic setting and use elements of science-fiction. The answers are all there. Oh yeah, it’s an hour long.

I started reading his books back in 2012 and was absolutely blown away by them. His down to earth prose, his raw and unapologetic characters, his livid battle scenes, his witty humour, all of it just captured me from the very start. I can’t even say what an honour it was to speak with him for over an hour face to face (we actually did meet in Sydney, where we arranged the interview). I doubt you’ll ever be seeing this, but thank you again, Joe. It was an absolutely pleasure, and I hope it is not the last time we have it.

Anyway, do check it out, for it is awesome. The link is here.

Back from America, and other stuff

As some of you may have noticed, I haven’t been that active, either here or on social media, etc. Well, that’s because for the past few weeks I’ve been paying a visit to good ol’ US of A. And you know what? I had a ripping good time.

Not all of it, though. We ran into at least a dozen complications with our booking before we even got to the mainland, this namely being the airline forgetting to put my dad’s last name on his ticket (how we even passed the gate in Sydney is an enigma that’s never gonna be solved), the travel agency assigning us to the wrong airline, an airline that we had to pay for both entertainment (a sorry selection at that) and meals. On a 22 hour flight.

Oh, and we couldn’t even sit together.

But we did manage to solve this all in the end, although the process was nothing but painful.

First stop was Hawaii before our connecting flight to Los Angeles, but I can’t say I remember too much of it since I was half-dead and completely jet-lagged. I just remember it being hot, sandy, and stormy. L.A. was a different matter entirely. We spent three days at Disneyland, California and Univerisal Studios park, and I can’t remember a time when I ever felt more like a kid. You’re never too old to go there, seriously.

You may, however, recognize these locals.

 

 

IMG_2431I’d have hoped you’ve seen Back to the Future, right? RIGHT?

IMG_2435 However, you’re less likely to have seen Gone Girl. This was where they filmed the kissing scene next to the sugar factory at the beginning. Yes, I was looking for the boxcutter.

Oh, and we went to this little place called the Hollywood walk of fame.

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And then was the drive to Vegas. Six hours through nothing but this.

IMG_2489It was a beautiful sight, though. You always hear about the Mojave desert, and you see the Mid-Western desert a lot in films. But to actually see the barren landscape for what it is…that’s a different story altogether.

And then, there was Vegas. Oh, Vegas….

IMG_2511I mean, seriously, who builds a metropolis of gambling, sex and booze in the middle of the desert? Americans, of course, and it was awesome. Not the gambling and sex, of course, but you can get some dirt-cheap beer in the States.

The thing about Vegas is that it’s wrapped in a time-warp. You can wonder the streets for hours and hours like we did, and suddenly realise it’s 1:30am. There’s no change in crowds, and (almost) everything’s open around the clock. I also couldn’t help thinking what would happen if there was some sort of apocalypse how lucky everyone in Vegas at the time would be. You’d likely be shielded from the worst of it and in one of the most lavish places on earth. But then they made a videogame out of that, so I won’t be copyrighting that concept!

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Oh, and I couldn’t not share this.

IMG_2540*Slow clap.* 10 points for creativity right there!

Sadly our trip there was pretty short and we drove back to LA in the early hours of the morning for our flight to New York City. We stayed in Brooklyn. Easily the highlight of the trip. It’s such a progressive place: it’s got such a *now now now* vibe to it that you can’t help but kept swept up in it. IMG_2575 IMG_2569

 

 

And then there’s Times Square.

 

 

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Seriously, there’s no place like it on earth. We only had a few days there, but it definitely wasn’t enough. A month would have only allowed us to scrape the surface. It’s a gold-mine of discoveries in that city and I’m roaring to go back.

I also had the opportunity to meet up with fellow author and editor Alex Shvartsman. A good many conversations over various things were had, and an extremely tasty pizza was consumed. I even reviewed his collection for Strange Horizons, which you can check out here.

I just wish I had more time in that place…IMG_2671

 

Oh, and look what I happened to pass by!

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Anyway, we were onto Boston to stay with my aunt and uncle. Now here’s where we ran into a roadbump: I got food-poisoning. Or something. I dunno what it was and at this point I’m afraid to ask. All I know is that our six hour drive from NYC to Boston consisted of me hugging my stomach and needing to stop every few minutes because I was on the verge of puking. Thankfully I didn’t and after what seemed like a drive through Satan’s personal traffic lane we arrived in Boston. It took me a good three days to recover. Three days of eating dry toast, drinking flat lemonade and sweating in bed. Amoung other things, but I’ll spare you the gory details.

Eventually I did recover, and we set out to explore Boston. It was definitely a much more relaxed pace than before – we weren’t rushing around desperate to see everything like before. And I have to say that Boston is a beautiful city. Very English. IMG_2690Oh yeah, did I mention Americans like guns? Like, like like?

No? Well, I am now. IMG_2732

I swear, there were more guns in that room than the entiriety of Australia. Rows and rows and rows of ’em. And yeah, I got to hold one. More than one. Many more than one. And that’s all I’m gonna say on the matter. But still, it’s strange to see these killing machines on the racks as if they were bread rolls!

A few more pictures o’ the landscape, including one that wouldn’t look out of place on another planet! Seriously, look at those veins in the rock!IMG_2743

We stopped at a little quaint village for coffee, and this was our view. You could do much worse.

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Aww, bless your heart, auntie. You’ll make anarchists out of us yet.

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Sadly, all good things must come to an end, and I’m back in Sydney, knee-deep in uni work and other stuff. It’s my last semester, which I have mixed feelings about. I can’t wait to get away from the study and work and turn to making a career out of writing and working in the publishing industry somewhere…but never getting up in the morning and going to your favourite class? No longer seeing your friends daily? No longer experiencing that university spirit? It’s a toughie.

 

Oh, and I do have news. Well, pretty big news in fact. We’ll call it That Thing that I Can’t Talk About™. Unfortunately I can’t talk about That Thing that I Can’t Talk About™ just yet, so it’ll have to be on hold. But it consists of several things, and those things are sales to major markets, including one I’ve been trying to break into for several years now.

But enough of my rambling. I’ll update you when I can.

And ’til next time, America! Keep being weird.

The Dreaded Query Letter

jeremyszal:

Anyone hoping to even have a sliver of a chance at getting an agent to look at your novel, reading (and applying) this is not optional.

Originally posted on Red Sofa Literary:

By Melissa Seymour, Spring 2014 intern 

Melissa SeymourThis past semester I had the pleasure of interning for Red Sofa Literary. I learned so much and had the ability to see what happens behind the scenes at a literary agency. One of my main tasks at Red Sofa was helping to read queries. And let me tell you, it’s not an easy task…for the writer or the letter recipient.

I have now been on both sides of the query letter. I’ve been the nervous writer sending my life work into the unknown and I’ve been the one clicking through hundreds of queries, searching for a golden egg.

Writers often associate words like “dreaded,” “terrifying,” or “the worst thing in the entire world” with the query letter but working for a literary agency has given me a new perspective. Your query letter is an opportunity. It’s exciting! This is your chance to show…

View original 327 more words

StarShipSofa Submission: Closed and Submissions Update

Hey everyone,

So now submissions for StarShipSofa are closed. Please do not send me any further submissions, and any sent will be deleted unread. I hate having to do this, so please don’t make me do it.

But anyway, thank you so much to everyone who submitted. I’m not going to disclose how many I got, but let’s just say that I received enough stories to last StarShipSofa for several years. Several, several years, in fact. So obviously this means I’ve got a massive wealth of stories to choose from and I’m looking forward to it.

But it’s going to take some time. More than I anticipated.

By my count, I got at least twenty stories of the novella-ish length. That’s around 15-20k of words each, multiplied by twenty. That’s easily the size of one of the longer A Song of Ice and Fire books, and that doesn’t include the other submissions, many of which are pretty damn long in their own right. But I’m not complaining: I asked for long submissions and I got ’em. But it’s going to take some time to read through them all.

Am I going to finish all these beasts? No. But I will definitely read for as long as I can, as a writer myself I know that the ending can make or break a story, and I’m not one to read a couple of paragraphs and instantly smash the big ol’ red reject button. But there does come a point when I’m prettttty sure I’m not going to pick this story up. But a lot of the time I can’t justify an answer unless I’ve gotten to the end, or near it. So please, be patient with me and I’ll have an answer for you sooner or later.

That’s it for now. Thank you all again for allowing me to consider your stories.

– Jeremy Szal

StarShipSofa Submissions: An update

This is my first time reading slush, and it’s lovely to see all the fantastic submissions pouring in. And ¡Ay, caramba!, I’ve come across some ripping stories. It’s an absolute joy to see this talent blooming, by both new authors and established authors alike.

I’ve already sent out a handful of acceptances, as well as a few rejections. Sending a rejection sucks just as much as receiving one, and I always try to pin-point what I personally didn’t like about the submission, or my reason for rejecting it. Remember, it’s just my opinion, and someone’s already picked it up, so you’re already on the right track.

But please, do remember to follow the guidelines. I’ve had a few submissions where the original publication venue is not listed, it’s addressed to “dear editor(s)” (despite the fact that my name is on the email address itself, and last time I checked I don’t have a double, as much as I’d like one). The latter I can forgive, but the former I cannot. I need to know if it was self-published by a vanity press, or if Ellen Datlow picked it up for her Tor anthology. It makes a big difference, and I will not read the work unless you follow these guidelines. Yes, it sucks, but I don’t have the time to trace its origin when I’ve got another 50 submissions from people who did follow the guidelines. It’s not fair on anyone. But overall I’ve had nothing but fantastic work and marvelous people, so keep that up.

This is the way I sort out the submissions. When the stories come in, I read from the earliest sent. I keep reading, and sometimes I’ll know immediately that this is a story I cannot let go, and I’ll email over the acceptance. Other times I’ll sadly have to send over a rejection immediately, as the story is not what I’m looking for. But most of the time, I’ll read the story and like it, and move it to the “Maybe/further consideration pile”. This means your story has a fighting chance, but I need to weigh it up amoungst the other submissions in the pile and decide against those merits. So basically, if you haven’t heard from me, you’ve moved to the maybe pile. The longer I hold on, the better. And I’m getting a lot of submissions, sometimes clocking it at 18,000 words, and for the most part can’t justify a response unless I’ve gotten to the end.

So, that’s it from Szal towers for now. Keep those submissions rollin’ and I’ll have an answer for you…sooner or later.

– Jeremy Szal

George R. R. Martin Approves of StarShipSofa, and episode round-up

As you may remember, StarShipSofa recently released a podcast of a story by George R. R. Martin, written in the 70s with a severely limited print run, but you can find more about that and how we got it here. But the night of launch, the entire podcast net exploded. Neil Gaiman retweeted and promoted us. Podcastle retweeted and promoted us. So did Drabblecast, Pseudopod, Apex Magazine, Jo Fletcher books, the Roundtable podcast, Cast of Wonders, Tor books, and countless other (big!) authors. Boing blogged about us, so did SFF Audio, and even Westeros org posted it, making connections to the podcasted story and the world of A Song of Ice and Fire, drawing links between the two.
We quite literally all together were given the stage in front of millions and millions of virtual viewers. Neil Gaiman himself is scraping 2.5 million twitter followers alone, let alone a publishing house like Jo Fletcher books! We had a mountain of people helping us out and giving their thoughts. We’ve shifted several thousand downloads, possibly reaching into the tens of thousands by now. A lot of people had an input on that.

Oh, and George R. R. Martin himself

Wait, what?

Yep. Mr. Martin actually went to his blog here and promoted the episode, also adding “Check it out for yourself. It’s free, and I thought they did a nice job.”

Just….wow.

GRRM

Not only did GRRM take the time to speak with me and allow us to use his story while Season 5 was AIRING (even as I type this the finale is being prepared for viewing on TV), but he also went of his way to promote the episode and praise it as well. Meaning that he listened to, at the very least, a part of our production.

Wow. Wowwowwowwow.

I said this on the blog, but I’ll say it here again. I first read ASoIaF when I was 13 or so, and the show a few years later when it came out. His worlds, his characters, his prose and complete mastery of world-building, plot and the English language has captivated and inspired me for more than half a decade. To get recognition (and praise) from him, and approval of the job we did, means so much to me I can’t even put it into words. That story he wrote all those years ago is part of his memory (he even put his mood as “nostalgic” on the post), something very precious to him. He could have refused to give us the story, and he could have been disgusted with what we did to it. But he didn’t, and he wasn’t, and that fact alone, coupled with how he stole away the time to express his approval, is by far the highlight of my writing slash editing career. His work means so much to me, and has done so much for publishing and fantasy, the genre I love, so having be given the honour of working with him and on his story has humbled us all very, very much.

Thank you GRRM. Thank you Nick for the narration. Thank you Tony. Thank you everyone who helped promote the episode. Thank you all the fans. Thank you all the listeners. Thank you.
– Jeremy

George R. R. Martin…on StarShipSofa!

Did you read that right? Yes, yes you did. I’m having trouble believing it myself, but it’s true alright. StarShipSofa has managed to procure a story by Mr. George R. R Martin himself.

How did this happen?

I’m glad you asked.

Getting this story was far from easy. In fact, it’s probably one of the hardest things I’ve ever done. GRRM is a household name, and the idea that a little scruffy guy like me, (19 years old at that) could possibly work with him, or even get a response from him, was always a long shot.

But I told myself it didn’t matter. I looked up a handful of his older stories, selected the one best suited for our podcast, and one that was unique, that being “The Men of Greywater Station”, first published in 1976, and shot over multiple requests. I basically told him who we were and what we did, gave him a pitch for adapting the story, then resigned to never hearing a thing from him. I mean, this is the guy who’s responsible for the multimillion dollar franchise, Game of Thrones. He’s basically the guy’s turned epic fantasy mainstream, sold millions of books, conned the term sexposition, and gotten countless fans weeping and moaning for the next installment of his series. Long story short: he’s the biggest writer working today, period. What hope in hell did I have?

Then one day, in the middle of my university lecture, GRRM responded. He wanted to know what sort of audio adaption it would be and how we’d do it. After scraping my brains off the ceiling, I told him the details. We talked a bit, straightened a few things out, and then he gave me the green light/go ahead. We had a George R. R. Martin story!

Only there was one problem: both the story (and the collection it appears in) are out of print (and have been since the 70s), and have never appeared online. Ever. I went back to him about this, and he offered to send me one of his own copies, or failing that, a carbon copy of the story.

So I gave him my address and that was that. Nick (our narrator) went ahead and bought the book himself, and did a smashing job of the narration. And now StarShipSofa has officially had the honour and privilege of adapting a story by King George R. R. Martin, Lord of the Literary SF/F kingdom and protector of the realm. Not only that, but this is the FIRST TIME the story has ever been online, or even available to the public, since the 1970s. No electronic file exists publicly, and certainly no audio version. Until now.

You can find the podcast here, and get some details on the episode and more, here:

I still remember reading the books for the first time watching the HBO TV series when it came out, being both thrilled and awed, horrified and swept away. I’ve been an avid fans for so many years, and at my age, with such little experience, to have had the honour of working with Mr. Martin and being entrusted with a little piece of his literary heart and soul to do it justice…no words can ever cover that. None. Ever.

So thank you, Mr. Martin. Thank you.

Something VERY, VERY big coming to StarShipSofa

So, me and Tony have been teasing this one out over the last couple of weeks. Something MASSIVE will be docking at the StarShipSofa. What, may you ask? That, I cannot say. However, I can tell you that it includes one of the biggest and coolest authors of modern SF/F today. It was bloody hard even reaching out to them, and negotiating was akin to walking on a tightrope made out of dental floss.

But I managed to secure a story from them, and I’m over the moon, man. And so is Tony, believe me. And our narrator, Nick Camm did a cracking job of the story. He always does, but he put everything he had into it.

And I can also tell you that getting the green light was only half the deal. Getting hold of the story was another matter entirely. It was extremely unconventional, and all four of us, (that being me, Tony, Nick and the author in question) had to work hard to get it done. But now it’s complete and I’m super stoked to hear the response.

Come on, tell us, I can hear you whining. Nope. Sorry, no go. Approximately only five or six people are aware of what’s coming, and we plan to keep it that way. Yes, it really is that big. I can guarantee with my life that you know this author and the work that they’ve done. But my lips are sealed.

Look out for it on Wednesday! June 3rd will be the day!

Until then…..

Jeremy

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